About

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I was born between 1946 and 1964 (1956 to be exact), so that makes me a Baby Boomer. I was enjoying my children and grandchildren, thinking everything was pretty much fine. Then George Floyd was murdered. Before that, events had shaped me that made me think I was attuned to racial injustice: growing up less than 25 miles from the capital of the Cherokee Nation, cross-cultural experiences with students staying in our home through the years, being part of a cross-cultural church in Chattanooga, TN, moving into John Lewis's congressional district in Atlanta, visiting a North African Muslim nation and falling in love with the people and their history. But nothing shook me the way 9 minutes and 29 seconds of footage did. My husband and I began to see our apathy and ignorance. We started reading anything we could get our hands on related to racial justice. After I read the chapters and answered the questions on White Privilege and White Fragility in Layla Saad's book Me and White Supremacy: Combat Racism, Change the World, and Become a Good Ancestor, I was face-down on the floor. It was clear that I had a lot to learn, but it was equally clear that I had to listen with humility and speak up. That's how this podcast was born. 

"After I read the chapters and answered the questions on White Privilege and White Fragility in Layla Saad's book Me and White Supremacy. . . , I was face-down on the floor ."

 

My Mission

My mission is a simple one - to challenge others from my own generation to stop, take a step back, and consider how we have been part of the larger picture of white privilege in America. White privilege (also known as White Advantage) is not something we can escape; however, we can be open to learning about it, acknowledging it, and being challenged to take positive action. If Baby Boomers allow themselves that possibility, they will be open to learning about white fragility, color blindness, tokenism, white exceptionalism, and so on. They will consider how they can listen, learn, speak up, and become involved as compassionate change agents alongside their Black brothers and sisters, preferably under their wise leadership.  

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